Tea news

Darjeeling tea crisis

2017-04-02 12:57 #0 by: Tealover

Are you one of those who like to sit down with a cup of lovely Darjeeling? Then you might want to read this.

The region of Darjeeling have been growing some of the finest teas in the world for about 150 years but since 2012 there has been more or less drought and the yields are less now compared to 2000-2009 with only 8700 metric tons a year in avarege, rather then 10 000 metric tons.

The weakened tea plants are more vulnerable to pest too, so the tea farmers and tea workers are battling a two front battle.

This year the hope of a better year seems slim but some are still hopefull for a better yeald in the future

https://www.worldoftea.org/darjeeling-tea-crisis-brewing/

Teanerd who loves tea so much that i started a tea shop www.tealovers.se!
Host of Tea savvity and the swedish version Te ifokus
Follow me on Facebook and instagram

Report
2017-04-08 12:28 #1 by: Teasenz

I think they can try to improve the tea more and sell for a better price. In such a way lower yield can be compensated by the price.

Secondly, individual farmers are still in a pretty bad negotiation position. The tea industry is very global, with a few large tea importers that dominate the market. It's very hard to get a fair price when negotiating with them. Farmers need to unionise more and negotiate together. There are some tea regions in China that do this smartly, but most still don't. They do get better prices by selling tea directly to end-consumers (friends and introductions).

At last, most farmers don't get agricultural tea insurance, this is something that is becoming more popular in recent years in China. Such insurance basically pays out for example when there's an x amount of days of drought in a row. Drought is a major risk that should be covered.

Report
2017-04-08 13:27 #2 by: Tealover

#1 In Kenya (I think it was) they are already going for more high quality teas (They have also problem with drought) to be able to coupe with drought and such. I guess one problem is that you'll need money for that so doing it in a big crisis is harder than when it's a medium big crise or a small crise.

Thanks for the link, I'll read it later

edit: It was Kenya. heres a link

http://worldteanews.com/news/kenya-to-expand-loose-leaf-production?NL=WTM-001&Issue=WTM-001_20170124_WTM-001_931&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_3

Teanerd who loves tea so much that i started a tea shop www.tealovers.se!
Host of Tea savvity and the swedish version Te ifokus
Follow me on Facebook and instagram

Report

Become a member

To participate in the discussion, you must first become a member. It is quick, simple and free. The membership gives you access to all our communities.